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[personal profile] krpalmer
Netflix made fewer new episodes of Voltron Legendary Defender available for the show's "third season" than it had for the first and second groups, but as I'm not really into watching lots of half-hour doses of one single program one after another, to the point of noting some trying to pack gluttonous overtones into the perhaps joking term "binge-watching," the shorter season didn't bother me too much. Once I'd watched my way through those new episodes at a measured once-a-week pace, I wound up feeling a bit impressed by how much seemed to have been put into them.
Some of those things )

A Farewell to Cassini

Sep. 15th, 2017 07:10 pm
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[personal profile] krpalmer
The news of it having been forty years since the Voyager missions launched might have helped remind me there wasn't much time left until the Cassini space probe, which has spent over a decade among the moons of Saturn the Voyagers flew through in a matter of days, burned up in Saturn's atmosphere (along with the shielded plutonium some people raised a great fuss about before launch a month short of twenty years ago) to make sure no possible microbes from Earth would make an accidental landing on moons now thought to have some chance to support life of their own. As I took in the features leading up to the final dive, I did get a bit conscious that while the probe has sent back plenty of photos over the length of its mission (making multiple gravity assists through the solar system to end up in a slow approach to Saturn suitable for braking into orbit), after a while I wasn't making the effort to keep up with the mission's official sites. Just this morning, though, with a scant few hours left before loss of contact, I did see an official e-book with plenty of good pictures in it and a few discoveries I hadn't quite picked up on before (such as the "propellors," big chunks in Saturn's rings visibly affecting the particles around them). This wealth of images does have me thinking of the previous gas giant orbiter Galileo, whose main antenna never opened properly (and there I'm conscious of swift and sour reminders this probably had something to do with the probe having been meant to be carried into Earth orbit by the space shuttle and the delays resulting from this) and which therefore couldn't send back many pictures. Cassini, in any case, was a regular presence and will hopefully leave lasting impressions.

state of nic

Sep. 9th, 2017 09:22 am
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[personal profile] nic
exhausted.

the last month involved
australia
GISHWHES
break wrist (the good hand so everything is a pain)
germany
greece

now extreme jet lag and catching up on 5 weeks of news/fandom.

oh and back to school (MBA) too.

Searching Just For Words

Sep. 8th, 2017 08:14 pm
krpalmer: (smeat)
[personal profile] krpalmer
While trying to come up with the next thing to post to this journal, I happened to think back to an article in the August issue of Scientific American about "inner speech," talking to yourself in your head. That a part of thought is unvoiced speech is an idea I've seen before, but all of a sudden I happened to wonder about the times I've just been trying to think only to find everything in my mind fragments, breaking off and jumping to something else. It felt a lot less involved than the "dialogues" I remembered seeing mentioned in the article, along with comments that reading dialogue in fiction can key into inner voices. I have been conscious for quite a while now of not reading fiction as regularly as I could. Even going back to the article and seeing a comment that inner speech can be telegraphic in brevity didn't quite help. The question is how to concentrate and stay focused.

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